Diversified Subjects – A Kaleidoscope of Thoughts

— Partha Pratim Mallik

The 8 films screened last year at BHFF touched several strata of the society. For example NayanChampar Din Ratri has not only depicted the life of underprivileged society, but also it is quite a bold narration of the urban life of a metro in the eyes of the representative characters, Nayan and Champa. At the same time if you pick up Take One, it depicts the life of an actress, who by and large is still being considered as a public property. We dissect the life of a woman every now and then without much respect about the human being behind the reeled character. We tend to forget even the lady is someone’s daughter or someone’s mother. Don’t you think Nayan or Champa and DoelMitra are actually sailing in the same boat? For the viewer of both the films, it is not difficult to find out the similarities in two distinctly different social strata. So different, yet so similar!

ApurPanchali and Meghe Dhaka Tara, two different kinds of biopic show how much research and passion are required to create the magic on screen. Both Kaushik Ganguly and Kamaleswar Mukherjee remained honest and grounded. Now if you see Rupkotha Noy, it is a different story where the characters represent a little puzzled time. The stress of our day to day life can leave us nowhere. But that’s not all. If there is a will, there is a way. Sisir Roy and his park friends finally prove that. Phoring is a rare picture in Bengali contemporary films’ history. Indranil Roychowdhury’s narration of the infatuation of an adolescent boy was detailed and it pointed out a very common phenomenon which perhaps many of us have faced in our time, but the society never admits. Or should I say our conservative set up hesitates to accept!

What more I can say about Jatishwar! Its beautiful music and powerful narrative sweep across social and historical spaces, bound by a thread of fiction has made this movie a classic to be remembered for a long time and proves what Srijit and his team can do.

Jodi Love Dile Naa Praane, based on SukantaGangopadhyay’s novel, is a breath of fresh air. It proves why we call a movie a ‘boi’ (book) in Bengali. It’s a silver lining on its own. AbhijitGuha and Sudeshna Roy deserve special thanks for reestablishing the bridge between literature and films. Love is eternal, so are human relations.

In a nutshell, the movies screened at the fest touch upon the vast kaleidoscope of Bengal’s cultural ethos that span over ages andspaces.

The 8 films screened last year at BHFF touched several strata of the society. For example NayanChampar Din Ratri has not only depicted the life of underprivileged society, but also it is quite a bold narration of the urban life of a metro in the eyes of the representative characters, Nayan and Champa. At the same time if you pick up Take One, it depicts the life of an actress, who by and large is still being considered as a public property. We dissect the life of a woman every now and then without much respect about the human being behind the reeled character. We tend to forget even the lady is someone’s daughter or someone’s mother. Don’t you think Nayan or Champa and DoelMitra are actually sailing in the same boat? For the viewer of both the films, it is not difficult to find out the similarities in two distinctly different social strata. So different, yet so similar!

ApurPanchali and Meghe Dhaka Tara, two different kinds of biopic show how much research and passion are required to create the magic on screen. Both Kaushik Ganguly and Kamaleswar Mukherjee remained honest and grounded. Now if you see Rupkotha Noy, it is a different story where the characters represent a little puzzled time. The stress of our day to day life can leave us nowhere. But that’s not all. If there is a will, there is a way. Sisir Roy and his park friends finally prove that. Phoring is a rare picture in Bengali contemporary films’ history. Indranil Roychowdhury’s narration of the infatuation of an adolescent boy was detailed and it pointed out a very common phenomenon which perhaps many of us have faced in our time, but the society never admits. Or should I say our conservative set up hesitates to accept!

What more I can say about Jatishwar! Its beautiful music and powerful narrative sweep across social and historical spaces, bound by a thread of fiction has made this movie a classic to be remembered for a long time and proves what Srijit and his team can do.

Jodi Love Dile Naa Praane, based on SukantaGangopadhyay’s novel, is a breath of fresh air. It proves why we call a movie a ‘boi’ (book) in Bengali. It’s a silver lining on its own. AbhijitGuha and Sudeshna Roy deserve special thanks for reestablishing the bridge between literature and films. Love is eternal, so are human relations.

In a nutshell, the movies screened at the fest touch upon the vast kaleidoscope of Bengal’s cultural ethos that span over ages andspaces.